Rob Knop's Gratuitous Kitties! Page

[Alyson + Echelle]

My wife and I are both extreme cat people. Pictured above is Alyson with our cat Echelle, whom I adopted back in 1995, and who moved with us to Nashville, TN in 2001. Echelle passed away of kidney failure in April, 2003

Current Cats

Picture of Harry Harry Boxlee (9 year old male, adopted May 12, 2003)
Picture of Buttercup Buttercup (11 year old female, adopted May 12, 2003)
Picture of Novella Novella (2 year old female, adopted April 21, 2012)

Regarding their names: Buttercup is so named because she's buttery in color and in personality. We call her "Butter" most of the time. Harry Boxlee is the name that the human society in Nashville had given him. We have no idea where that name came from, or to what it is a reference, but it seemed to fit him somehow. Novella is so named because she has a short tail. (A "short tale", get it? Ha ha? Ha ha? Erm, never mind.) There was clearly some trauma in her past, as her short tail is bent and kinky, as if it had been severed, and the remaining part broken and not healed quite right.



Other kitties we have known

Picture of Zeus Zeus (1996?-2011)
Picture of Echelle Echelle (1990?-2003)
Sebastian Sebastian (my dad's cat)
Picture of Dart 1/sqrt(2) |Zap> + 1/sqrt(2) |Dart > (1984?-2000)
Sister + Baggins My sister Linda (1970-) and our cat Baggins (1978-1996)


Regarding the name of Dart (or Zap): it is a quantum mechanical expression which says that the cat's name is an overlap of the two eigenstates "Zap" and "Dart". (She's a Schroedinger cat, see.) In practice, this means that when you measure her name (i.e. call her something), half the time her name comes out as "Zap", and half the time it comes out as "Dart". In actual practice, most of the time I call her "Kitty" (which is redundant with Echelle), or "Fuzzy" (in comparison to Echelle's "Fluffy").

If you think this cat's name is hopelessly nerdy, you're right. Lest you think that Echelle was lucky for not getting a nerdy name, be aware that an Echelle grating is a high-order dispersive element used in astronomical spectrometers.

If, when you went to the "cat" page, you thought you were going to see a treatise on the Unix command, you have no right to think me nerdy.

[Echelle with Carrot on Head]