The Process For Creating Aquatint Etchings

PREPARING THE PLATE

Aquatint etching is a technique that produces a full tonal range and rich texture in etchings. To create an aquatint, rosin dust is dropped onto a copper plate and then the rosin is melted onto the plate. This produces a matrix of small acid resistant dots across the surface of the plate.

One of my goals is to be a resourse for other printmakers. Below are more detailed descriptions of how I create my aquatints:

AQUATINT CLASS:

Single rosining aquatint: Petaluma Oaks

Multiple rosining aquatint: Shadows

Creep-etch: Skagit

Multiple-plate aquatint: Evening Reflections

I have also written three Technical articles on aquatint etching for printmakers.
Photo by Susan Sanford © 2000
The plate is heated on the hot plate to melt the rosin. A loupe is used to observe the progress of the melting.
PAGE 1, PREPARING THE PLATE
PAGE 2, DRAWING THE IMAGE
Photo by Susan Sanford © 2000
The plate goes into the rosin box after the the crank has been turned to raise the rosin dust.
PAGE 3, MULTIPLE PLATE PRINTS
PAGE 4, PRINTING THE PLATE
The Process For Creating Lithographs