N6GN's Pages


An October 2016 Pacificon Presentation, SWTL Summary and Demonstration which is a sort of summary of the SWTL technology, demonstrations and other activities on these pages. Please note that this is NOT "G-Line" as described by Goubau (which required slowing the wave down) nor is it the same as what Tesla described.


2nd Demo -100 meter SWTL (view on YouTube) - transmission/recovery of 144 MHz power guided along a single .013" (0.32 mm) conductor transmission line (SWTL) at 144.5 MHz using very light weight launchers. This system can be used to power quadcopters/aerostats for continuous flight while providing extremely low loss connection to elevated antennas - enabling quickly deployable, long range, very high bandwidth communications systems for Internet, emergency and other communications.




Power transmitted over a single 0.32mm wire (view on YouTube) 1st Demonstration - transmitting real power across a short single .013" (0.32 mm) conductor transmission (SWTL) at 146 MHz.



Any Ham Can Have A 400' Tower! October 2015 Pacificon Presentation, SWTL+Aerostat.

2m Halo vs. 4 el. Yagi Pictures and results of a balloon-supported 2m halo antenna at 160' AGL, fed and tethered by a SWTL, WSPR used to measure and demonstrate 25 dB improvement over a ground-mounted 4 element 2m Yagi.



Using SWTLs to Power Multi-Rotor Aircraft which Support a High-Altitude Antenna A way to keep a quadcopter or other motorized aerostat aloft permanently while at the same time supporting and feeding antennas at great height.


Propagation Measurement Using a Quadcopter, This article describes the use of a quadcopter to measure the relative attenuations due to beam deformation by ground and attenuation due to terrain and foliage absorption. QEX May/June 2016 (with permission ARRL)

Pacificon 2011 Antenna Forum, I gave a presentation includes an overview of three different amateur applications for surface wave transmission line, along with a new antenna theory for understanding conventional antennas such as dipoles and monopoles as surface wave devices. All but the first of these, "A Flying Antenna" have been published as a three part series in ARRL QEX.